?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

#63 - Cricket in Times Square

by George Selden

My son and I recently joined a local book club for homsschooled children, and this was the first book we read for the group. I’d read it years ago, of course, and had fond memories of it – but I found that I really didn’t remember anything about the story, other than that I liked it. It’s a very sweet story about a cricket from Connecticut who accidentally ends up in the subway station at Times Square. While there, he makes some friends, and discovers that he has an amazing talent. It’s a lovely story (and I got all sniffly at the end, even though it’s not really sad). My son enjoyed it – and we had fun at the discussion group yesterday, too. 9/10

Comments

( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
robingrace
Jul. 15th, 2006 05:08 am (UTC)
I definitely remember that as ne of my favorite books at home, too! Sometimes I forget that the books we loved when we were kids are still around.
happy_potterer
Jul. 16th, 2006 10:35 am (UTC)
I loved that one. Ooh, and the great Garth Williams illustrations . . . I read another by George Selden about the same characters: Harry Cat's Pet Puppy. There is at least one other, but I never read it . . . yet. That's what having kids is for, right?
here_be_dragons
Jul. 19th, 2006 06:48 pm (UTC)
I don't remember reading any others when I was a kid, but we looked at the library and there is a BUNCH of other books with these characters! Yesterday, we read "Harry Kitten and Tucker Mouse," which tells how they met and became friends. And we've got two others to read, too. FUN!

And yes, that's absolutely one of the benefits of having kids. I get to revisit all this great cool kid stuff. And go to children's films without feeling like some kind of freak. :D
my_own_petard
Jul. 16th, 2006 06:36 pm (UTC)
Aww. A Cricket in Times Square. I remember that one. Well, like you, I remember that I read it and loved it. What a nice way to revisit it--by sharing it with your son.

I wish I could have a child to read to, to teach, to take to museums, but then give back when it's tired or cranky or begins to believe it's oh-so-much-smarter than any adult in the vicinity.
skelkins
Jul. 17th, 2006 09:27 am (UTC)
I loved that story as a child. In fact, I seem to remember that it was responsible for my always wanting to try liverwurst, even though I'd tried it before and already knew that I hated it. It just sounded so good in the book!
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Teresa Jones